My Sunflower Lanyard and JAM Card 🌻

I wanted to share a photo of my sunflower lanyard / JAM card set-up! If you’ve never heard of it a JAM Card allows people with a learning difficulty, autism or communication barrier tell others they need ‘Just A Minute’ to process things / respond both discreetly and easily.

 Those with a communication barrier are often reluctant or unable to tell others about their condition and a JAM Card allows this to happen in a simple, effective non-verbal manner. 

JAM Card was originally developed for those with learning disabilities and difficulties. However, it can be used by anyone with a communication barrier. For instance, JAM Card can be used by people with Asperger’s or autism. It can also be used by those who have a brain injury and people who otherwise feel self-conscious about their ability to effectively communicate when engaging with others. 

Here’s the JAM Card website if you’re interested in finding out more information: jamcard.org

 You can choose which message you would like on the other side of your card: I have autism/Asperger’s, I have autism, I have a condition or I have dementia/memory problems..I ordered the plastic card holder separately via amazon and my badges are from @okay_doodle and @doodlepeople.

There is also a JAM Card app you can download for free if you don’t want to order the card. The JAM Card was the idea of NOW Group’s social forum Kidnap Wednesday, a group for adults with learning difficulties who meet weekly. The card is available in the UK and Ireland. Sunflower lanyards can be accessed via @sunflowerlaynardscheme or at most customer service desks in supermarkets.

Image ID: 

Image 1: A green lanyard with yellow sunflowers on a white background with a small ‘Just a Minute’ card next to it
Image 2: The other side of the card showing the text ‘Please be patient. I have autism.’
Image 3: A green lanyard with yellow sunflowers on with two badges pinned to it saying ‘Hello I am susceptible to Sensory Overload’ and ‘Loud noises startle me’, The ‘Just a minute card’ and a plastic ID holder.
Image 4: A close up shot of the green lanyard with yellow sunflowers on with two badges pinned to it saying ‘Hello I am susceptible to Sensory Overload’ and ‘Loud noises startle me’.

BBC Commission ✏️

Hello! I was commissioned by the lovely people at the BBC to create a series of images providing tips on how to be more accessible on social media – check it out on the @bbc account! (see below!)

To mark the 25th anniversary of discrimination against disabled people being made unlawful in the UK, with the Disability Discrimination Act the BBC are sharing a range of content from disabled creatives. 

I will be making sure I add Alt text and image IDs on my instagram posts (in comments section below) from now on, I always have captions on my YouTube videos (I’m someone who loves watching videos with captions and I see so many benefits, for me it helps so much with my understanding and processing difficulties). I’ll make a more conscious effort to caption videos across my social media platforms and capitalise my hashtags for screenreaders.

Swipe / click through the image carousel below! >>>

10,000 Instagram Followers and an International Giveaway! 🎉

HOLY MOLY there’s now 10,000+ (10.2k to be exact) of you lovely people following meeeee on Instagram! It honestly means the world to me that so many awesome people follow little old me and my journey ☺️ Eeeeee! Thank you is all I can say – I’m excited for the future of my Instagram account and there’s lots more doodles to come ✏️ 

To celebrate reaching this milestone…I’m doing an International Giveaway of the below items over on my Instagram!

  • Lendoo Magnetic Rings Fidget Toy
  • Tobar Twist and Lock Blocks Fidget Toy
  • Flippy Chain Fidget Toy
  • Toroidz Flow / Kinetic Ring
  • Pocket Gecko Fidget Toy (Pink) I was gifted 3 of these and want to give one away
  • AND…I’m going to throw in a small hand drawn doodle from me which I’ll sign!

To enter go over to my Instagram!

Giveaway ends in 10 days (Monday 16th November at 11.59 GMT)

Interoception (inner sense) drawing…🧠

Hello! Here is drawing number six (part of a series on our 8 senses, scroll back in my feed to see my previous drawings!) ✏️ which is all about Interoception which is a lesser known sense that actually helps you understand and fell what’s going on inside your body (think of it as an inner sense)…

  • A sensory diet is important! It’s a way of self regulating (like using fidget and stim toys) and usually involves physical activities like rolling on a yoga ball, having time on a swing or trampoline, heavy work activities like using weights or lifting and carrying things. The idea is a sensory diet helps you to become more grounded as you are getting the regular input that your body needs. As a result you may feel calmer and more in control of your behaviour and mood. I’ve definitely seen the benefits of having a sensory diet (for example I use a therapressure brush to do body brushing which has helped me to desensitise my limbs to touch).
  • I never feel full…like my stomach and brain just doesn’t have that sense wired in..it’s really odd and can be annoying (comment down below with a hands-up emoji to join the club) I experience this even more in restaurants, due to the busy, noisy environment I literally cannot connect to what my stomach is feeling because I am filtering so much other information.
  • Visual cues – these can be super helpful, especially to remind ourselves to do daily tasks like personal hygiene, to drink and eat enough and what to expect during the day. I know a lot of people use social stories (google the term for more info, they were developed by Carol Gray in 1991) as a tool to help with self care skills, social skills, changes in routine, etc. You can make Velcro versions so you can easily change out what your day looks like.
  • Hypersensitivity to pain…if you’re a sensory being you may well be hypersensitive (over-sensitive) to pain…I know I am!! I am very tuned in to pain and when something hurts it REALLY HURTS even if it’s something small like a cut it’ll be super distracting to me. Equally you may be hyposensitive to pain (under-sensitive) and not realise if you are hurt/injured.
  • Grounding exercises – these are super useful when your mind is whirring, thoughts swirling and your heartbeat feels a bit rapid and all over the place. Most smart watches have in-built breathing exercises / apps built into them (e.g Apple Watch does, my Fitbit does too!) and these can be helpful in terms of distraction by looking at something visual and timing your breath along with an animation. Of course there are lots of different grounding exercises, another good one to use when you are overwhelmed is to sit and use your senses to ground you, name a few things you can hear, smell, touch, see, etc. This can diverts your brain and distract you.
  • Alexithymia is a difficulty in recognising emotions and identifying feelings. This is something my autism assessor said she think I might struggle with. I definitely find it super difficult to explain my feelings to others because I genuinely cannot recognise or process my own emotions.

    Do comment down below if you can relate to anything in my drawing or anything I’ve said, I’m always keen to hear how everyone copes with these things. Two more drawings to go in this little series!

Touch and Tactile Processing…🚷

Hello! Here is drawing number five (part of a series on our 8 senses, scroll back on my blog to see my previous drawings!) ✏️ which is all about touch and tactile processing….

  • Weighted blankets are THE BEST. I got mine from @sensorydirect (they do a great scheme where you can borrow a blanket on a trial period to see if it’s right for you before purchasing it) I’ve had mine for a few years now and I bought a lovely pale green cover for it which looks fab on my bed!
  • Unexpected touch is hugely overwhelming and can be quite frightening to me. For example – anybody coming up to me and tapping me on the shoulder from behind or just touching me when in conversation with me is too much to handle.
  • Fidgets, you know the score, they are pretty great. They work as good stim toys and distractions when in different environments. 
  • Cooking and baking…I hate the texture of ingredients on my hands! I have to wash my hands a lot when baking things because it affects my mood when I have distracting weird textures on me. Things like egg, flour, kneading dough are too overwhelming. Fun fact: When I was at secondary school we had to make a dish in food technology class involving handling mince meat…I hated this idea so I took like medical gloves in to avoid the direct texture (I got some very funny looks from the rest of my class) yet when we started cooking everyone seemed to want gloves and nobody wanted to touch the meat!
  • Oversized clothing = comfy! I like huge baggy t-shirts and jumpers with skinny jeans / jeggings. I prefer tighter things on my bottom half and much looser clothing on my top half.
  • Labels and tags inside clothing are THE WORST. I don’t understand why there can be small books worth of labels inside some clothing items and they seem to be a nightmare to detached without leaving jagged annoying edges or leaving a hole in the actual clothing. I love @uniqlo clothing as their t-shirts don’t come with any tags (just information printed inside!).

What do you struggle with it term of touch and tactile processing? Comment down below!

A new drawing and a new podcast episode…✏️🎙

Here is drawing number four (part of a series on our 8 senses, scroll back to see my previous drawings!) ✏️ which is all about auditory processing and dealing with sound….

  • Water flowing is something I find really calming to listen to and grounding, keeping me present in the moment. I love listening to the sea, and running baths whilst sat and listening is something I find very theraputic (to the extent where I’ll ask my family if anyone is planning on having a bath so I can listen!)
  • Surprise noises! Ugh they are the worst and I think alot of people will be able to resonate with me on this one. I’m talking about abrupt fireworks, loud babies and children crying (makes me feel upset / emotional I have no idea why), noisy clocks ticking, loud sneezes, that sort of thing.
  • The sound of nature is fab. Just getting out and away from screens and noisy town traffic for a walk has definitely been something I’ve been enjoying over the past few months. 
  • Noisy eaters…I appreciate a lot of people don’t know that they eat nosily or actually might not be noisy eaters but I LITERALLY PICK UP ON EVERY SOUND around me which is frustrating! Also weird sensory thing: I cannot stand the noise of drinks pouring. I don’t know what it is but I hate the ‘glug’ / ‘glugging’ sound as it pours into a cup – it sets me on edge. 
  • Repetitive sounds, I understand that these are important, such as ambulance sirens, loud halers, fire alarms, they are alerting us to important things. It’s just they can make me jump and feel overwhelmed / unsettled very quickly. I’m an expert at masking this when I am out and about.
  • Music and podcasts are something I naturally gravitate towards. I am definitely more into podcasts than I am music (I get songs stuck in my head very easily which is very annoying so I can never listen to music in the evening otherwise I go to bed with a song on loop in my head!). I like to work and listen to podcasts on loads of different topics such as crime, policing, graphic design, illustration, autism, mental health, self care, science, technology, etc.
  • Construction and building work…again I’m sure lots of people can relate to this one! There is nothing worse sensory-wise then the constant background noise of construction work. It’s unpredictable, varies in noise levels and can mess with my mood instantly.
  • Hearing protection is THE BEST! Ear plugs, earphones, over ear headphones, wireless headphones, ear defenders the list goes on. They can really help surviving in loud environments and blocking out varying levels of sound.

Let me know how you cope with sound and which sounds you love / hate in the comments below!

Also…I released a new podcast episode yesterday…

Episode 23: Special Guest, Allie from @whensouthmetnorth

In this episode I was joined by the the super lovely Allie (@whensouthmetnorth). Allie is an autistic creative and advocate who alongside her current postgraduate study (a masters degree in Education Research at the University of Oxford) is also a research consultant for Neuropool which is a start-up for supporting neurodivergent people run by neurodivergent people. Allie has a special interest in creative writing and is a published poet. She is currently writing a novel and also drafting her first ever play script, which features an autistic protagonist.

So here’s what we chat about:

  • All things autism related…her journey to diagnosis and her autism assessment experience
  • Life throughout secondary school and university and coping in a sensory world
  • We touch on relationships with friends, family and partners
  • And…annoying noises we both can’t tolerate!

Apple Podcasts   Google Play Music  Overcast   Pocket Casts  Spotify

A new 21andsensory podcast episode!

In this month’s episode I had a chance to speak to the very lovely Emily (find her @autie__eevee on Instagram). We spoke about a whole range of things such as her self diagnosis of Autism and her journey to be formally assessed, her first year studying Fine Art at university, her special interests and hobbies and about her amazing Instagram account!

Search for the 21andsensory podcast wherever you get your podcasts from!

Apple Podcasts   Google Play Music  Overcast   Pocket Casts  Spotify

A new doodle and a new podcast episode! 🎙

Working from home by 21andsensory

Here’s my latest doodle…Working from Home (Autistic / Sensory Edition) My latest podcast episode on this topic has just gone live so if you would like to hear me talk about the pros and cons of working at home in more detail (and just generally rambling on like I usually do) search for 21andsensory wherever you usually get your podcasts! Here’s some more info on the episode:

In ‘Episode 19: Working from home and managing life in lockdown’ I chat about:

  • How I have found working from home and the process from the very beginning 👀
  • Struggling with meltdowns, overwhelm, change and routines 🧠
  • My current work set-up and how I’m coping ✏️
  • The pros and cons of working remotely 👩🏻‍💻
  • And finally an advice section for those working / studying / revising / teaching / generally trying to live and survive at home during lockdown 🏠

Screenshot-2018-12-30-at-11.30.04

A collab on an illustration ✏️

IMG_4487

Hey everyone – hope you are all doing okay. Emily (@autie_eevee) reached out to me during the week to ask if I wanted to collab on a lil’ drawing with her – she designed the circular graphic and we each filled out a half (I filled out the sensory defensive half and she filled out the sensory seeking half) Zoom in to check out all the little details and see her great description below:

Sensory Seeking and Sensory Defensive

For me, this is a topic which I struggle with and causes me anxiety, because I doubt whether I am autistic because my sensory issues aren’t as heightened as others. However, I think that it is often forgotten that sensory issues – just the same as autism – is a spectrum. Everyone has different sensory issues and needs and so I have teamed up with the lovely Emily from @21andsensory to create this infographic about the sensory spectrum. 

Sensory sensitivity is a spectrum, on which you can be situated anywhere – and it can actually differ from person to person, with some people having a range of sensitivities for different things. For example, you could be highly sensitive to sound but not sensitive to touch.The terms for ‘being sensory sensitive or not’ is “sensory defensive” or “sensory seeking”.

As the names suggest, sensory seeking people are often HYPOsensitive to sensory input, meaning that they search for it and enjoy the sensory experiences. Sensory defensive people are HYPERsensitive to sensory input, meaning they actively avoid it, due to it being uncomfortable and causing physical pain or discomfort for them. 

I am still learning about where I am on the sensory spectrum, although I know I am a mix of the two and it very much depends on the situation I’m in as well. However, I hope this post has been helpful and informative in a little talked about topic! 💖