My Sunflower Lanyard and JAM Card 🌻

I wanted to share a photo of my sunflower lanyard / JAM card set-up! If you’ve never heard of it a JAM Card allows people with a learning difficulty, autism or communication barrier tell others they need ‘Just A Minute’ to process things / respond both discreetly and easily.

 Those with a communication barrier are often reluctant or unable to tell others about their condition and a JAM Card allows this to happen in a simple, effective non-verbal manner. 

JAM Card was originally developed for those with learning disabilities and difficulties. However, it can be used by anyone with a communication barrier. For instance, JAM Card can be used by people with Asperger’s or autism. It can also be used by those who have a brain injury and people who otherwise feel self-conscious about their ability to effectively communicate when engaging with others. 

Here’s the JAM Card website if you’re interested in finding out more information: jamcard.org

 You can choose which message you would like on the other side of your card: I have autism/Asperger’s, I have autism, I have a condition or I have dementia/memory problems..I ordered the plastic card holder separately via amazon and my badges are from @okay_doodle and @doodlepeople.

There is also a JAM Card app you can download for free if you don’t want to order the card. The JAM Card was the idea of NOW Group’s social forum Kidnap Wednesday, a group for adults with learning difficulties who meet weekly. The card is available in the UK and Ireland. Sunflower lanyards can be accessed via @sunflowerlaynardscheme or at most customer service desks in supermarkets.

Image ID: 

Image 1: A green lanyard with yellow sunflowers on a white background with a small ‘Just a Minute’ card next to it
Image 2: The other side of the card showing the text ‘Please be patient. I have autism.’
Image 3: A green lanyard with yellow sunflowers on with two badges pinned to it saying ‘Hello I am susceptible to Sensory Overload’ and ‘Loud noises startle me’, The ‘Just a minute card’ and a plastic ID holder.
Image 4: A close up shot of the green lanyard with yellow sunflowers on with two badges pinned to it saying ‘Hello I am susceptible to Sensory Overload’ and ‘Loud noises startle me’.

Why shops can cause sensory overload…🛒

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Hi everyone I’m back again with a lil’ illustration…’Why shops can cause sensory overload’ 👀 I (secretly) struggle quite a lot in shops and supermarkets (when I say secretly I mean I’ve perfected the art of ‘masking’ my struggles!). There’s always SO much sensory input to deal with in shops and I wanted to try and mention a few of the things that can be overwhelming. Bigger supermarkets especially can be quite disorientating when so much is being thrown at me sensory-wise.

Every sense is sort of attacked all at once?! This means it can be very difficult to find the things you need as you have to visually wade through colourful shelves, deal with all sorts of noise, queues and crowds, smelly food counters…the list goes on!

I know there’s lots of good tips and tricks to helping with these busy environments such as using ear defenders or headphones, wearing a sunflower lanyard (UK initiative – to subtly let staff know you might need some extra help / consideration), using distractions like stim toys, etc…but do you have any other tips for surviving shops? Comment down below!